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bologna.lab

Lehrveranstaltungen Wintersemester 2015/16

 

 

Sozialwissenschaften, Geschichte, Wirtschaft / Social Sciences, History, Economics

Monday
10:00-12:00
Room 0323

Introduction to German social and educational policies: the National Minimum Wage and the Educational Rerform in Berlin

Anne Christine Holtmann 

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

This seminar will deal with the question of how welfare state institutions and concrete social and education policies and initiatives shape individual life courses and life risks. We will approach this questions through a comparative perspective and through conducting qualitative interviews. The first part gives an introduction to comparative research on welfare states, education systems and the transition into the labour market. In the second part, we investigate the effects of the recent introduction of a minimum wage in Germany. We will conduct qualitative interviews to find out about the impacts of the minimum wage on employment and on the transition into the labour market. In the third part, we will investigate the transition from school to work of low educated young people and of refugees. We will get an overview of different policy measures and civil society initiatives to support the entry into the labour market, and conduct qualitative interviews. In the fourth part, we focus on the impact of education systems on students’ performance and inequality in a comparative perspective and conduct interviews on the secondary school reform in Berlin. Before the reform, students in Berlin were separated into three different school types at the age of 12 with only the highest school tracks leading to A-levels that give access to universities. Since the reform, students are tracked into two different school types only, which are both supposed to offer the possibility to complete A-levels. We will investigate how the reform worked in practice. To sum up, the seminar explores how social and educational policies impact on people’s lives both from a comparative perspective and through interviews with people in Berlin. 

Monday
12:00-14:00
Room 0323

The EAST/WEST Competition – Urban Planning, Cultural Policy And Economics in Divided Berlin

Michael Grass

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

This seminar examines the dualism in urban planning between East and West Berlin chronologically. Seminar presentations and two field trips trace the diverse targets and demands of capitalist and socialist urban planning. For the analysis, we do not only consider architectural and formal aspects. Cultural contexts, political ideas and funding strategies will be looked at as well.

Monday
14:00-16:00
Room 
0323

FUNDING BERLIN – alternernative economic strategies, activism and urban change

Michael Grass

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

This seminar investigates some projects and alternatives in urban devolepment – one time avantgarde and contemporary pioneers. We will explore building cooperatives; talk to urban gardening activists; and listen to former squatters present their projects, their visions and their funding strategies. A publication of the results will be prepared with the help of professional publishers and editors. This seminar targets students interested in urban sociology and planning, metropolitan studies, German cultural history, economics, and cultural management. It will impart theoretical knowledge as well as fundamentals of producing and publishing academic writing.

Tuesday
10:00-14:00
(biweekly)
Room 0323

Berlin – portrait of a city. An introduction to creative urban research 

Anna Blattner

(Language requirements: min. English B2/German A2, as some core readings will be in German)

This seminar will provide insights into the key political developments in Berlin’s recent history, from the fall of the Third Reich, through the decades of political and physical division, to the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and Germany’s subsequent reunification.

Friday
16:00-18:00
Room 0323

History of Germanies (1871-1990)

Frank Beyersdorf

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

This course surveys German history through the prism of Berlin between the Confederation of the Rhine to the second unification of the German lands in 1990. We concentrate on politics and political culture of the Germanies.
Friday
12:00-16:00
(biweekly)
Room 0323

starts 16 October
2015

 

Berlin, 1945-1990: Divided City

Dr. Peter Mitchell

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

This seminar will provide insights into the key political developments in Berlin’s recent history, from the fall of the Third Reich, through the decades of political and physical division, to the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and Germany’s subsequent reunification.

   
 

 

Kulturwissenschaft, Literaturwissenschaft

Monday
16:00-18:00
Room 0323

Autobiographical Perspectives on GDR History 

Martina Berner

(Language requirements: min. English B2, German A2)

The public memory of the GDR is, more than twenty-five years after Germany´s reunification, still contested. In regular intervals it is for example discussed whether the GDR can be described as an „Unrechtsstaat“ (illegitimate state). And while the public interest to learn about the  surveillance apparatus of the Stasi is still growing, it is often criticized that the focus on control and oppression does not coincide with the everyday experiences of many GDR citizens. In this seminar we will read mostly autobiographical texts that deal with the system of oppression in the GDR and questions of individual conformity or resistance as well as with everyday experiences. We will discuss these individual memories in order to enable students to contextualize and interpret various memory discourses.

Tuesday
14:00-18:00

(irregularly)
Room 0323

starts 17 November 2015

 

Re/Inventing Berlin - Architecture after 1945

Alessa Paluch

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

At the end of World War II Berlin , the former capital of Hitlers Third Reich, was largely destroyed. But the area-wide destructions also held a chance: the possibility to rebuild Berlin as a totally new city – in modernists words: as a better city. And indeed Berlin changed dramatically – but not in the way modern architects and urban planners had envisioned it in the post-war period.
Quite differing proposals were made in East and West Berlin. Especially for the so called Capital of the Cold War it proves to be true that architecture is a not just a mirror to the society which builds it – but that architecture also shapes the lives of the people living with and within it.
Using examples such as Karl-Marx-Allee, Hansaviertel, Gropiusstadt, Potsdamer Platz et al. this seminar retraces the stations and phases of reconstruction with a focus on political, cultural and social developments. The most influential concepts of 20th century urban planning will be presented. In addition the seminar aims to be an exercise in (architecture) criticism.

Wednesday
12:00-14:00
Room 0323

Studying Popular Music with a Focus on Electronic Music Festivals in Berlin

Bianca Ludewig

(Language requirements: min. English B2, German A1)

This interdisciplinary course explores club cultures, electronic music scenes and their festivals. The seminar investigates Berlin as a traditional stronghold of the international electronic music scene. It will supply the participants with scientific tools (concepts, discourses, theories, methods) for researching popular music. Through different theories and case studies the students will investigate the complexity of electronic music as a highly organized and institutionalized cultural practice within a postmodern society. The seminar will involve approaches from fields like anthropology, musicology, organizational studies and cultural studies.

Wednesday
14:00-18:00
(irregularly)
Room 0323

Exploring Key Aspects of Berlin's Museological Landscape

Dr. Victoria Bishop-Kendzia 

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

This interdisciplinary course explores some key aspects visible in Berlin’s museological landscape. It will focus on issues of Self and Other constructions as attested in museums and exhibitions. The aim of the course is to use anthropological methods to explore the sites and critical analyses to reflect upon them. This thematic course touches on several disciplines. It is based in empirical social anthropology, especially in terms of theoretical framework and methodology. It does, however, involve a historical overview of the Jewish narrative in Germany from just before 1933 to the present and an overview of migration issues.

Thursday
10:00-12:00
Room 0323

Berlin Audiences

Judith Vöhringer

(Language requirements: min. German A2, English B1)

The public or rather audiences of culture as a concept in cultural theory and as an object for empirical study is not only of interest to researchers but likewise gaining importance for institutions and facilities in the cultural field. In this reading course we will examine first of all the diversity of cultural production in Berlin and its respective audiences. It aims at deepening our understanding of the wide range of phenomena in this field by applying concepts of cultural theory ´s classics as well as current approaches in audience research. Based on the examination of selected case-studies, we will discuss the aims and results of actual research on Berlin audiences and identify issues for further research.

Thursday
16:00-19:00
Room 0323

A Taste of Berlin

Linda Heyden, Marie Schröer 

(Language requirements: min. English B2/German A1)

Eating is an everyday practice, so profane it seems to be just a physical necessity to stay alive. Its ubiquity easily hides the variety of discourses and the many sign systems that influence and are linked to the simple gesture of eating and preparing food. Who eats what and where refers to the history, culture and conception of a region and its inhabitants. In return, national and regional habits of eating find their linguistic expression in idioms and metaphors. For individuals and social groups alike, food serves as a marker of identity and a means of distinction - symbolism, ritual behavior, myths, themes and motives of food and eating can be read and analyzed as signs(ystems).

Friday
10:00-12:00
Room 0323

Strolling in Berlin: Experiences in the city and its literature and culture in the years 1920s and 1930s

Dr. Stefanie Rinke

(Language requirements: min. English B2/German A1)

The seminar focuses on Berlin in the years 1920s and 1930s. It deals with the cultural practices, in particular the art of taking a walk (strolling), the culture of salaried masses and the consumer culture, and analyses cultural practices by reading literature and film. To learn about the intersection of literature and practices, e.g. concerning reading the street like a book, the seminar takes place in university (in-class course), studying texts in close reading, and study trips in the town (field trips).